newhousebooks:

Cover of Art Direction Feb 1958. Ken Saco art director, John Berg designer.

This is why we can’t have nice things.

This is why we can’t have nice things.

A pair of posters for some RISD events this week around Read Across Rhode Island: two free screenings of the documentary “Google and the World Brain” and a talk and discussion called “The Book in Translation.”

Dos-à-dos-à-dos-à-dos-à-dos-à-dos.
erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding
Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Luther, Martin, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.
Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

Dos-à-dos-à-dos-à-dos-à-dos-à-dos.

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding

Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Luther, Martin, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.

Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

p-dpa:

P—DPA is online! 

Currently the archive includes works by Constant, Jesse England, Karolis Kosas, Johannes P Osterhoff, Benjamin Shaykin and Six:Thirty.

Have a look :)

libraryoftheprintedweb:

Library of the Printed Web at LA Art Book Fair, Jan 31 – Feb 2. Opening Jan 30, 6–9pm. The Geffen Contemporary at MoCA. Table F10.

I won’t be in LA, but very much looking forward to seeing this in person.

Tumblr convergence: Alvin Lustig in Herb Lubalin Study Center (top) and Wile E. Coyote in Content Aware Typography (bottom). Tumblr convergence: Alvin Lustig in Herb Lubalin Study Center (top) and Wile E. Coyote in Content Aware Typography (bottom).

Tumblr convergence: Alvin Lustig in Herb Lubalin Study Center (top) and Wile E. Coyote in Content Aware Typography (bottom).

who-wore-it-better:

Andrew Norman Wilson Scan Ops Mother Goose’s Melody Or Sonnets for the Cradle ::  Benjamin Shaykin Google Hands

Oof (2)
(another Ruscha for contentawaretypography)